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Will tech ever be able to disrupt the business card?
Lifestyle, 4:01
<p>In an age of social media, the business card is a surprisingly resilient piece of paper. While we are yet to see the killer app that has sent this humble format the way of the newspaper, plenty have tried to build it.</p> <p>The latest effort is Knock Knock, the Washington Post reports. The premise is that you knock twice on your phone’s screen, and you can quickly share your contact information and social media accounts with those nearby - provided they’ve also installed the app. </p> <p>Knock Knock is not alone, other efforts have included startups like Bump, Hashable and CardFlick. No one has quite cracked it yet. Perhaps in the West it is only a matter of time before there is a solution that finally kills off the card, but it might be a bigger challenge in Asia where the custom of exchanging cards has existed for 400 years.  </p> <p>That said, in Japan - the cultural heartland of the business card - entrepreneur Chika Terada has started Sansan, a cloud-based CRM platform that lets user scan and upload their cards.  The startup offers two services: Sansan and Eight. Sansan is for businesses, while Eight is for individuals. </p> <p>The idea has at least gained traction among venture capitalists. TechInAsia reports that Sansan has already raised a $14 million Series B round in June. </p> <p>At least the business card will stick around for some time. After all, the most successful technology is often the most convenient. What could be more convenient than putting a piece of paper in someone’s hand?<br /> Photo: Geoffrey Franklin<br /> &nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
Buffett is voting Hillary, but 'admires' Bernie
Lifestyle, 4:01
<p>Bernie Sanders may be reaching out to the middle and lower classes, but he has at least one fan in the 1%.</p> <p>Billionaire Warren Buffet told CNBC that he admires the Sanders campaign, reports Business Insider. "I think Bernie Sanders has been a terrific campaigner. He campaigns exactly as I would campaign if I were a candidate," Buffett says.</p> <p>Buffett has openly supported higher taxation for the rich, but Sanders' tax-reform proposals would increase even beyond what Buffett has suggested. Buffett says he respects Sanders' refusal to attack opponent Hillary Clinton, as well as his advocacy for regulations on political spending by businesses and unions.</p> <p>Alas, Buffett is still backing Clinton. He says Clinton has been too glib about her email controversy, but he supports her policies.</p> <p>Sorry, Bernie. "He's not going to get elected," says Buffett, "but I admire him."<br /> Photo: Marc Nozell </p>
When secret agents go off-road: The Bentley SUV
Lifestyle, 4:01
<p>The car closely associated with British spy James Bond has had a US-style makeover - introducing Bentley's SUV, the Bentayga.</p> <p>According to Forbes magazine, the Bentayga starts at $229,100 before tax and is a more "svelte and handsome" version its ugly concept forbear. </p> <p>The car will be shown to the public for the first time at the Frankfurt Car Show this month. Sales will start in Europe, the Middle East, followed by China and US, late in the second quarter.</p> <p>For motor-heads: the sporty automobile has a  6.0 liter, 12-cylinder twin-turbo engine -  a version of which is set to appear in the Audi A8 limousine and Volkswagen Phaeton II - which takes you to 60 mph in just four seconds.</p> <p>Perfect for out-running Russian spies in an Alpine car chase.<br /> Photo: Bentley</p>
Nerves of steel: City bosses abseil Lloyd’s building for charity
Lifestyle, 4:01
<p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Lord Mayor Alderman Alan Yarrow led a group of 85 abseilers down the 289ft tall building façade of one of the City’s most iconic buildings to support the annual Lord Mayor’s Appeal, Finbuzz reports.</p> <p>The aim was to raise a total of £100k for a number of charities including Mencap and Scope. Charity events will continue to be held in 2015, so check out the Lord Mayor’s Appeal event calendar.</p> <p>For most participants, including Lawson Muncaster, founder and managing director of City A.M., it was their first time ever abseiling.</p> <p>. @CityAM sends founder over the edge (of the Lloyd's Building - for charity) http://t.co/oErsfh7ouypic.twitter.com/Ap3IpGjC6c<br /> — City A.M. (@CityAM) September 4, 2015<br /> No special preparation or shoes were needed, however a team of professional climbers was ready to help on the roof. Still many abseilers stalled for several minutes before stepping over the edge. Some humorously confessed that they should not have watched abseiling YouTube videos the day before.</p> <p>Despite the nerves, the Master Carman of the year Lieutenant Colonel Paul Holder RLC, who donned a Superman costume, said he never felt so confident and relaxed.</p> <p>“It is quite a lot of adrenaline, I really enjoyed it, and for a good cause,” commented Ben Fuller, Head of the Investment Trust Team at Winterflood Securities.</p> <p> The Master C</p>
[Book Review] Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics
Lifestyle, 4:01
<p>Richard H. Thaler has spent his career studying the radical notion that the central agents in the economy are humans?predictable, error-prone individuals. Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics is his arresting, frequently hilarious account of the struggle to bring an academic discipline back down to earth?and change the way we think about economics, ourselves, and our world.</p> <p>Traditional economics assumes rational actors. Early in his research, Thaler realized these Spock-like automatons were nothing like real people. Whether buying a clock radio, selling basketball tickets, or applying for a mortgage, we all succumb to biases and make decisions that deviate from the standards of rationality assumed by economists. In other words, we misbehave. More importantly, our misbehavior has serious consequences. Dismissed at first by economists as an amusing sideshow, the study of human miscalculations and their effects on markets now drives efforts to make better decisions in our lives, our businesses, and our governments.</p> <p>Coupling recent discoveries in human psychology with a practical understanding of incentives and market behavior, Thaler enlightens readers about how to make smarter decisions in an increasingly mystifying world. He reveals how behavioral economic analysis opens up new ways to look at everything from household finance to assigning faculty offices in a new building, to TV game shows, the NFL draft, and businesses like Uber.</p> <p>Laced with antic stories of Thaler’s spirited battles with the bastions of traditional economic thinking, Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics is a singular look into profound human foibles. When economics meets psychology, the implications for individuals, managers, and policy makers are both profound and entertaining.</p> <p>This article was published by ValueWalk. </p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
Video: America has more opportunities today than 60 years ago, says Ken Langone
Lifestyle, 4:01
<p>"America owns the world for the next, at least, 25 years," says Ken Langone, co-founder of Home Depot, on Wall Street Week. There are more opportunities for young people today than there were 60 years ago, Langone says. Langone, a proud Republican, says he supports New Jersey Governor Chris Christie for president in 2016, but will back whomever gets the Republican nomination. The Republicans "need to have definition," he says, saying many candidates such as Sen. Mark Rubio are inexperienced and running for the wrong reasons.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
UBS hires Annie Leibovitz for new ad campaign
Lifestyle, 4:01
<p>Though she is better-known for snapping photos of celebrities and musicians for Vanity Fair and Rolling Stone, Annie Leibovitz now works for Europe’s fifth largest bank, UBS, writes Finbuzz.</p> <p>The Swiss bank commissioned the photographer for the new ad campaign “Can I truly make a difference”, where Leibovitz holds photo sessions with budding entrepreneurs who all deliver speeches on their individual impact on the world, making sure to mention UBS’s mantra, “Together, we can find an answer.”</p> <p>In the 1980s, Leibovitz worked on an ad campaign for American Express which featured portraits of celebrities who were clients of the bank.</p> <p>UBS has also enlisted Leibovitz for a separate project called “Women,” a photography collection that is a sequel to the portrait book she created in 2000.</p> <p>The exhibition tour will debut in London in January 2016 before going to Tokyo, San Francisco, Hong Kong, Singapore, Mexico City, Istanbul, Frankfurt, New York, and Zurich. The photos will then become part of the bank’s corporate art collection, which already includes over 35,000 works.<br /> Photo: UBS</p>
Bernie Sanders pulls ahead of Hillary Clinton by 9 points in New Hampshire race, says new poll
Lifestyle, 4:01
<p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here's a shocker for Labor Day Weekend,  Bernie Sanders is pulling ahead of Hillary Clinton for the Democratic race for the presidential nomination.</p> <p>It's all of a piece in this very topsy-turvy race in which fringe candidates are muscling in on the party-blessed candidates.</p> <p>According to the NBC/Marist poll, the Vermont senator would win 41% of votes in a New Hampshire race. Clinton garners 32% and Vice President Joe Biden would get 16% -- and he's not even running. Yet.</p> <p>In July, Clinton commanded a 10-point lead, according to the poll.</p> <p>In first-up Iowa, Clinton's lead has more than halved from 24 points to 11 points. In the caucuses, the former Secretary of State would win 38% of votes vs 27 points for Sanders. Biden claims 20%.</p> <p>And, in keeping with the theme of we-don't-care-what-the party-bosses want, Donald Trump is ahead in Iowa by 7 points and 16 points in New Hampshire. The Republican field is much more crowded than the Democratic. Seventeen candidates are vying to become the GOP nominee. Ben Carson is nipping at Trump's heels and the presumptive party choice, Jeb Bush, is trailing badly at 6%.<br /> Photo: Marc Nozell</p>
Why investment bankers are switching suits for startups: the story of Vasco Serpa
Lifestyle, 4:01
<p>After spending 17 years as a banker at Goldman Sachs, Merrill Lynch, and Banco Espirito Santo, Vasco Serpa turned to startups, investing in five lifestyle and leisure companies. One of these projects is ABoatTime.com, which is the equivalent of Airbnb for hiring a boat, Finbuzz reports.</p> <p>During his transition from banking to entrepreneurship, Serpa took a “sabbatical year” and spent much of this time on the water. Serpa sees himself as one of the leading trendmakers of banking veterans leaving the industry to invest in startups.</p> <p>A young sailor with an Olympic dream</p> <p>“I am from Portugal, but in the early stages of my life I lived in Mozambique and Venezuela,” said Vasco, 43, who looks a bit like Hemingway: bearded and tanned with a wide smile sitting relaxed with his white shirt open. The only thing missing was a captain’s hat.</p> <p>“My father was a merchant navy captain, so I grew up in the environment of sailing and sea.”</p> <p>At age 10 he went back to Portugal and started sailing in the local club in Cascais, becoming part of the national team at 15. Then he went to the junior world championship and later his boat, the “Laser” was selected as an Olympic category one. He started sailing the world with the pre-Olympic national team. Meanwhile he got into the top economic school in Portugal, Universidade Nova de Lisboa. “I can’t say that I had an urge to become a banker, but economics was what I ended up choosing. I guess at that time my mind was more into sailing…” Vasco said with a smirk.</p> <p>While finishing university he faced a choice: either participate in the 1996 olympics or take an investment banking job his uni professor offered him. He chose the Olympics.</p> <p>“Eventually I placed 7th out of 54, so I was very happy but when I got a call from a friend just after the Games, asking me if I wanted to finally come to a job interview, I decided it was time to see how far the flow of finance would take me”.</p> <p>The Investment Banker</p> <p>Vasco got the job and started as a broker at the Portuguese-based bank Banco Espirito Santo (BES). Soon after he became a fixed income trader.</p> <p>“The Industry was booming,” explained Vasco, “we were in the stage that lead to the Monetary Union in Europe. Portugal, which was closed from 1974 to 1980, and had already had an IMF intervention that ended in 1985, was now an EU member and was growing strong, it also became part of the MSCI index, which meant we joined first world’s markets. My bank was doing great, lots of young people came to the industry and their careers were flying. It was a moment of growth.”</p> <p>But Vasco was still not fully satisfied and wanted to get his Olympic medal. So late in 1998 he took off and started to sail professionally again in order to prepare for the 2000 Olympic trials. After he “only” ranked second in Portugal and was not selected to join the Olympic team, he finally decided to fully commit to his banking career, eventually becoming head of corporate derivatives sales in 2003 at BES.</p> <p>In 2005 Merrill Lynch in Madrid brought him onto the fixed income sales team that covered Institutional clients in Iberia.</p> <p>“The perception then was that the world economy was in perfect shape in many extents,” Vasco said. “But you sensed that the leverage in the economy was running a bit high. There was plenty of liquidity in the system, competition to lend was high, credit spreads were at minimum and lending criteria too loose. Yo</p>
Serena Williams gets no respect when it comes to endorsement. Here's why.
Lifestyle, 4:01
<p>Serena Williams stands on the cusp of winning all four major tennis tournaments in one year, a feat that has been seen just five times, the last time in 1988. Despite her prowess on the court, Williams makes much less money than other tennis stars.</p> <p>On Forbes's list of highest paid athletes Williams ranks 47th, reports The Atlantic. Of the seven tennis players on the Forbes list, Williams is last for endorsement deals with just $13 million annually. Williams is poised to win her 22nd Grand Slam title this year, and has dominated American sports, let alone women's tennis. Roger Federer, the male tennis counterpart to Williams, will earn almost $58 million in endorsements this year. Even Maria Sharapova, no where near able to touch Williams' skill, will make $10 million more than Williams. So what gives?</p> <p>For starters Williams isn't male. Despite what one could assume, Federer falls short of Williams' 21 Grand Slams, holding only 17. Federer has spent 302 weeks ranked number one. Williams has been number one for 250 weeks, but she's on the road to surpass Federer soon. And as for win-loss rations, Federer has about 4.4 wins per loss. Williams has 6. It's not like Federer or his male counterparts are bringing more viewers than Williams either. The women's finals in the U.S. Open have surpassed the men's for the last two years. This year, the women's final of the U.S. Open sold out before the men's.</p> <p>Sorry "experts," men really aren't more marketable for athletics either, even though marketers love targeting young men. Women control $29 trillion buying power in across the globe, and make 64% of household purchasing decisions. Sketchers and Nike have both picked up on it, steering their marketing to women.</p> <p>Williams' other problem, apparently, is that she's black and muscular. Thin, blonde Sharapova makes more than Williams, although she's not as strong of a player. Williams has been attacked before for looking too "manly," and not fitting the stereotypical feminine sexy that Sharapova does.</p> <p>At least Williams' doesn't let her under-appreciated value keep her down. She recently launched the "Greatness Collection" with Nike, and is ready to slay anyone standing between her and another Grand Slam.<br /> Photo: Marianne Bevis</p>